New Four-Horned Dinosaur Species Discovered in Montana

New Four-Horned Dinosaur Species Discovered in Montana

A newly identified dinosaur species, Lokiceratops rangiformis, has been discovered in the badlands of northern Montana. This four-legged, plant-eating dinosaur lived approximately 78 million years ago during the Cretaceous Period. Measuring around 22 feet (6.7 meters) in length and weighing about 5-1/2 tons, Lokiceratops is distinguished by its unique set of blade-like horns, which resemble those of the Norse god Loki, and asymmetrical horns on its frill. Unlike many other ceratopsians, Lokiceratops lacks a nose horn, suggesting its horns were not primarily used for defense against predators.

The discovery of Lokiceratops, which translates to "Loki's horned face formed like a caribou," offers insights into the rapid evolution of species in a limited geographical region. The fossils were unearthed about two miles (3.6 km) south of the U.S.-Canada border. Scientists believe that the horns could have been used for intimidating rivals, attracting mates, or recognizing members of the same species. The dinosaur's remains are now part of a collection at the Natural History Museum of Utah and a sculpture based on its skull is being created for display.

Summary

Other news in science