IDF Widely Used Hannibal Directive on October 7

IDF Widely Used Hannibal Directive on October 7

On October 7, during a Hamas-led attack, the Israeli military activated the "Hannibal Directive," a controversial policy aimed at preventing the capture of Israeli soldiers by enemy forces, even at the risk of killing the soldiers and civilians. This directive was used at multiple military locations infiltrated by Hamas, including the Erez border crossing, the Re’im army base, and the Nahal Oz outpost. The order involved extensive bombings and heavy firing, which also put kidnapped Israeli civilians at risk.

The directive was implemented as part of a broader response to the attack, which resulted in the deaths of over 1,150 Israelis and foreigners, including around 30 children and 300 women. Approximately 250 individuals, including soldiers and civilians, were taken captive by Hamas, many of whom are believed to have been killed in subsequent Israeli airstrikes. The Hannibal Directive, established in 1986 and reportedly repealed in 2016, mandates the use of any means necessary to prevent the capture of Israeli soldiers, a practice that has drawn significant controversy and scrutiny.

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